Surf+lessons+surfing+Waikiki+Beach+Rentals+Rental+Things+to+do+Hawaii+Honolulu+Oahu

Surf lessons Waikiki

The best place in the world for taking Surfing Lessons the famous Waikiki Beach on Oahu Honolulu

Surfing Hawaii

What is considered an open-group surf lesson?

An Open-Group surf lessons can be either you grabbing a group of friends and family or you joining other people. This type of lesson ranges from two people to large groups. The ratio of surf instructors to students are determined by the instructor which he/she will decide by the wave conditions, weather conditions, and the amount of people. Most group lesson ratios are one instructor to four students. Group lessons are a great way to meet people from all over the world and create new friendships and also learn about different cultures throughout many countries.  Students must be 13 years of age or older.


What is considered a private-Group surf lesson?

Private Group lessons are usually smaller groups. This allows more attention from the instructor. This lesson is designed for family and friends who want to do a surf lesson together without other people joining in. This could be a parent(s) and children, siblings, or 2 to 4 friends who want to make sure they are the only ones laughing at each other :).  Students must be 13 years of age or older.

You will have the chance to catch more waves and learn about the surf etiquette on how to catch your own waves, which waves to choose, how to find the right place to catch a wave, and much more.


What is considered a private surf lesson?

Private surf lessons are for a person who wants individualized attention and isn’t interested in sharing his/her waves with others:). There are many reasons why someone would request a private lesson: (A) He/she is not comfortable in the water, (B) He/she took a lesson before and wants to go for bigger waves, (C) He/she wants the focus of the instructor and does not want to wait for other people to catch a wave before his/her next wave, and (D) He/she is a child below 13 years old and is unable to paddle back after each wave and therefore needs a personal instructor for safety reasons.


Surf lessons Waikiki Oahu Honolulu Hawaii


History of Hawaii's ICON surfer

"Duke Paoa Kahinu Mokoe Hulikohola Kahanamoku (August 24, 1890 – January 22, 1968) was a Native Hawaiian competition swimmer who popularized the ancient Hawaiian sport of surfing. He was born towards the end of the Kingdom of Hawaii, just before the overthrow, living into statehood as a United States citizen. He was a five-time Olympic medalist in swimming.  Duke was also a Scottish Rite Freemason[3], a law enforcement officer, an actor, a beach volleyball player and businessman.[4]


According to Kahanamoku, he was born in Honolulu at Haleʻākala, the home of Bernice Pauahi Bishop which was later converted into the Arlington Hotel.[5] He had five brothers and three sisters, including Samuel Kahanamoku and Sargent Kahanamoku. In 1893, the family moved to Kālia, Waikiki (near the present site of the Hilton Hawaiian Village), to be closer to his mother's parents and family. Duke grew up with his siblings and 31 Paoa cousins.[4]:17 Duke attended the Waikiki Grammar School, Kaahumanu School, and the Kamehameha Schools, although he never graduated because he had to quit to help support the family.[6] 


"Duke" was not a title or a nickname, but a given name. He was named after his father, Duke Halapu Kahanamoku, who was christened by Bernice Pauahi Bishop in honor of Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh, who was visiting Hawaii at the time. His father was a policeman. His mother Julia Paʻakonia Lonokahikina Paoa was a deeply religious woman with a strong sense of family ancestry. 


Even though not of the formal Hawaiian Royal Family, his parents were from prominent Hawaiian ohana (family); the Kahanamoku and the Paoa ohana were considered to be lower-ranking nobles, who were in service to the aliʻi nui or royalty.[5] His paternal grandfather was Kahanamoku and his grandmother, Kapiolani Kaoeha (sometimes spelled Kahoea), a descendant of Alapainui. They were kahu, retainers and trusted advisors of the Kamehamehas, to whom they were related. His maternal grandparents Paoa, son of Paoa Hoolae and Hiikaalani, and Mele Uliama were also of aliʻi descent.[4]:9[7] 


Growing up on the outskirts of Waikiki, Kahanamoku spent his youth as a bronzed beach boy. At Waikiki Beach he developed his surfing and swimming skills. In his youth, Kahanamoku preferred a traditional surf board, which he called his "papa nui", constructed after the fashion of ancient Hawaiian "olo" boards. Made from the wood of a koa tree, it was 16 feet (4.9 m) long and weighed 114 pounds (52 kg). The board was without a skeg, which had yet to be invented. In his later career, he would often use smaller boards but always preferred those made of wood. 


On August 11, 1911, Kahanamoku was timed at 55.4 seconds in the 100 yards (91 m) freestyle, beating the existing world record by 4.6 seconds, in the salt water of Honolulu Harbor. He also broke the record in the 220 yd (200 m) and equaled it in the 50 yd (46 m). But the Amateur Athletic Union (AAU), in disbelief, would not recognize these feats until many years later. The AAU initially claimed that the judges must have been using alarm clocks rather than stopwatches and later claimed that ocean currents aided Kahanamoku.[8]  He was initiated to the Hawaiian Masonic Lodge No 21[9][10] [11] and was also a member of the Shriners society[12]."  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duke_Kahanamoku


"Surfing is a surface water sport in which the wave rider, referred to as a surfer, rides on the forward or deep face of a moving wave, which usually carries the surfer towards the shore. Waves suitable for surfing are primarily found in the ocean, but can also be found in lakes or rivers in the form of a standing wave or tidal bore. However, surfers can also utilize artificial waves such as those from boat wakes and the waves created in artificial wave pools.  The term surfing refers to the act of riding a wave, regardless of whether the wave is ridden with a board or without a board, and regardless of the stance used. The native peoples of the Pacific, for instance, surfed waves on alaia, paipo, and other such craft, and did so on their belly and knees. The modern-day definition of surfing, however, most often refers to a surfer riding a wave standing up on a surfboard; this is also referred to as stand-up surfing. 

Another prominent form of surfing is body boarding, when a surfer rides a wave on a bodyboard, either lying on their belly, drop knee, or sometimes even standing up on a body board. Other types of surfing include knee boarding, surf matting (riding inflatable mats), and using foils. Body surfing, where the wave is surfed without a board, using the surfer's own body to catch and ride the wave, is very common and is considered by some to be the purest form of surfing. 

Three major subdivisions within stand-up surfing are stand-up paddling, long boarding and short boarding with several major differences including the board design and length, the riding style, and the kind of wave that is ridden. 

In tow-in surfing (most often, but not exclusively, associated with big wave surfing), a motorized water vehicle, such as a personal watercraft, tows the surfer into the wave front, helping the surfer match a large wave's speed, which is generally a higher speed than a self-propelled surfer can produce. Surfing-related sports such as paddle boarding and sea kayaking do not require waves, and other derivative sports such as kite surfing and windsurfing rely primarily on wind for power, yet all of these platforms may also be used to ride waves. Recently with the use of V-drive boats, Wakesurfing, in which one surfs on the wake of a boat, has emerged. The Guinness Book of World Records recognized a 78 foot (23.8 m) wave ride by Garrett McNamara at Nazaré, Portugal as the largest wave ever surfed.[1]"  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surfing




Price:

Military price

$45/person Open-Group

$65/person Private-Group

$100/person Private


General Public price

$60/person Open-Group

$80/person Private-Group

$125/person Private

Book Now!